Why I Blog for TESL Ontario

Image source: www.bigstockphoto.com
Image source: www.bigstockphoto.com

I often get asked how I stay connected with the TESL community since I’m not always teaching. Blogging as a volunteer guest blogger for TESL Ontario is an avenue I chose to do just that. So, I thought I’d share what I love about blogging for TESL Ontario with you. Be warned, this may entice you to apply!

When I applied to become a TESL blogger, I was excited. When I got the call to be interviewed, I was nervous (but the good kind of nervous).  And when I found out that I was selected to be one of the bloggers, I did a happy dance, (luckily all of you didn’t have to witness it…I digress).

A Sense of Belonging

I love the sense of community you feel when you’re part of the TESL Blog Team. The leads are so supportive and are there to guide you when needed. And they always manage to make the blog post look and read even better.

Behind the Scenes

The behind-the-scenes crew are amazing individuals. When I blog I have one job and that is to submit a post every month to my team lead. Of course it has to be well written, free of grammatical errors, (save for those pesky ones that escape you), and be original content. But what you don’t know, (and I’ll wager to say that none of my fellow bloggers know this either), is that there is an intense process that happens in the background including: editing, sourcing images (when needed), re-editing, approving content, contacting the blogger if a question or issue with the post needs to be addressed, meeting publishing deadlines, etc.  These women do it so effortlessly, which is a testament to the great work and dedication they put in to ensure that the TESL Blog is the success that it is. Bonus tidbit — they use a colour-coded key to help them easily figure out what stage a certain post is in once it’s been submitted by one of the bloggers. How neat is that?

Banking PD Hours

Blogging for TESL Blog is also a great way to keep up to date with your PD hours.  One of the perks of being a member of this Blog Team is that while you’re busy writing your thoughts away once a month, you’re fulfilling your professional development hours for the year! I think that’s a pretty sweet deal, especially with small children at home and a husband away at work. As a busy mom, it’s a wonderful option to have.

Virtual Colleagues and Collaboration

Perhaps one of the best things about blogging for the TESL Ontario Blog is that you’re connected with many of the ESL teachers out there that you wouldn’t ordinarily meet, due to location, workload, or busy lifestyle. As a result, the blog creates a sense of community among teachers of ESL. It’s a place where we can all share what we know and any tips and advice we may have that our fellow teachers can benefit from. Personally, I love hearing back from all of you whenever a post is published. Reading your two-cents puts a smile on my face and energizes me to carry on blogging.

Having a Full Bucket

Even though everything I’d just mentioned is pretty amazing in and of itself, I have saved the best one for last. This experience has boosted my self-confidence to new heights. Being a part of this team and sharing what I know, plus gaining wisdom through all of you, is priceless. You read my blogs and leave comments sharing your knowledge and personal experiences, which makes my experience that much more valuable.

Thank You Readers!

So, I guess this post is to say thank you to everyone for supporting this initiative by reading, participating, and leaving comments. Engaging in discussions is the best way to stay current on recent events in the ESL world while showing support to your fellow colleagues, who are constantly on the hunt for the next great topic of discussion!

Hoping you all have a great day and happy reading.

What would you like to hear about? What do you think is the next great topic of discussion?


One thought on “Why I Blog for TESL Ontario”

  1. Thanks for this great post and for asking what we would like to read about in the future. I would love for someone to blog about some PBLA success stories. How many teachers out there are using Portfolio Based Language Assessment? How many are gearing up to do so? Or, for teachers not working in a CIC-funded program, do you incorporate a needs assessment, goal setting by learners, learner reflection, and other elements of PBLA? If so, how effective do you find those tools to be? I myself am still in the training phase but am VERY excited about the potential for PBLA to help my learners become more aware of strategies they could be using, how to set goals, and the relationship between their taking ownership of their goals / learning and success in reaching those goals.

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